May 31, 2023


A tableware can say much more about its owner (and his state of mind) than he thought. The cinema is the great proof of this. In the film I sound l’amore (Luca Guadagnino, 2009) The table with which the actress Tilda Swinton honors the patriarch of the Recchi family is planned to the millimeter, with distinguished Bohemian crystal goblets, delicate porcelain plates and the color white above all. On the other hand, when Emma’s character is carried away by her desire and cooks for her lover the fish soup that her grandmother taught her in Russia, the disorder and the rusticism permeates every inch of this slinky table.

In the universe of Pedro Almodóvar, on the other hand, the decoration is one more character in his films, and the kitchen is that place in which to reflect the emotions of its protagonists. The Colors coffee set, designed by the Portuguese factory Vista Alegre, garners attention in the film The Skin I Live In (2011), with an intense orange color and rounded shapes at the height of its plot. fritzlangiana.

The end of summer is a good time to update this essential element of our table, both from day to day and from home gatherings that are coming up with the drop in the thermometer. With Japan, the saturation of colour, metal and irregular patterns as rising trends, this guide offers alternatives to the hackneyed white tableware (which is also renewed) to find our style when sitting at the table. With the enhancement not only of Spanish crafts, but also of ancestral techniques brought from other parts of the world. The best thing is to open your mind and not set limits when it comes to serving up a succulent recipe.

1. If it is a single color, let it be the sea

Traditional craftsmanship anchored in Portugal and Swedish design have been bridging the gap in Mateus tableware for three decades. Its creator Teresa Mateus Lundahl, together with her daughter Filippa, knows how to infuse color and contemporary shapes into a table that seems to live in an endless after-dinner, without disdaining its pottery origins in each plate and container. This collection available at yoox.com delves into the seabed between bubbles and shells, with a succulent indigo enamel to dive into. From 24 euros the plate of 20 centimeters.

Tableware designed by Mateus.
Tableware designed by Mateus.

2. First rule: not following rules

The rigidity with which the table was set at meetings and celebrations has passed away. Marguerite Preston, editor of WireCutter’s product recommendations for The New York Times, He strongly defends combining plates of different colors and sizes, skipping the order and strict placement of cutlery, as well as mixing all kinds of patterns and tones without a specific pattern. Preston seems to have read the minds of the creators of &klevering, the Dutch decoration brand that has a legion of fans in its wake. Only they are capable of mixing plates with cartoon fruit drawings, crocheted tablecloths and cocktail glasses in the Mad Men and that the play goes well. Set of four Orange Full plates for 42.50 euros.

Virtue is in the mix, according to the Dutch firm &klevering.
Virtue is in the mix, according to the Dutch firm &klevering.

3. Living in perpetual tea time

Who hasn’t fantasized about celebrating their ‘unbirthday’ like Alice at an anarchic table full of cakes, buttered buns and tea grounds? Bringing this passage from Lewis Carroll’s novel to life will be easier with a classic among tableware: the Crane tea and coffee set. Decorated with white, green or plum stripes and a gold vein, it consists of plates of three sizes, sugar bowls, cups, a teapot and other serving utensils. When the snack is over, the plates will become a colorful ally for breakfast, light dinners or as auxiliary containers for bread or sauces. Available at El Corte Inglés starting at 15.95 euros (the set of two dessert plates).

The Crane tea and coffee set.
The Crane tea and coffee set.

4. At the table with C. Tangana

The memory of those summer afternoons browsing through the Fuengirola markets, browsing vases and bowls, remained forever etched in the mind of María Estrada while she lived in Los Angeles (USA). Upon her return to Spain, she decided to transfer her nostalgia and recover this part of Spanish crafts that she had forgotten about. Together with his partner Santos Bacana, creator of the production company Little Spain, and C. Tangana they founded Casa Maricruz, an Iberian design firm with crockery, glasses and other utensils that can be seen on the already popular tables of the artist’s video clips and live shows. from Madrid. Its ceramics are made by potters from Cáceres and Granada who incorporate new glazes and colors onto their ancestral designs. In the image, a plate with the traditional hand-painted fly drawing in the Cáceres meadow (24 euros).

Dishes from Casa Maricruz, with the traditional hand-painted fly design in the Cáceres meadow.
Dishes from Casa Maricruz, with the traditional hand-painted fly design in the Cáceres meadow.

5. Japanese dinners

Inheritor of the humble forms and the handmade glaze that characterizes the Hagi ceramics of Japan, the Merci de Serax collection transforms the act of eating into a game of textures and colors. The boxes to carry food in the Japanese country known as bento inspire these sets to serve from a clay or wooden tray, to which is added an infinity of small containers in different sizes and irregular enamels. Designed in collaboration with the concept store French Merci. From 5.5 euros at finnishdesingshop.com.

The Merci de Serax collection, heir to the Hagi ceramics of Japan.
The Merci de Serax collection, heir to the Hagi ceramics of Japan.

6. When in doubt, wear white

Despite the explosion of colour, textures and patterns that invades the current table, the snowy color continues to be the king of tableware for everyday use. It is synonymous with elegance, good taste and can be effortlessly combined with more daring formulas in color and size. Facile tableware, designed in solid porcelain that can be used for a long time even in the dishwasher and microwave, gives a twist to the usual design with a thin black rim and a pronounced cavity. Crockery for six people (18 pieces) for 179 euros at Westwing Now.

Facile tableware, designed in solid porcelain that allows its prolonged use even in the dishwasher and microwave.
Facile tableware, designed in solid porcelain that allows its prolonged use even in the dishwasher and microwave.

7. The most sought after terracotta

For a few seasons now, this clay, normally covered by a thick layer of glaze, has been on display throughout the kitchen. With a modern and strictly round plan (as the current trend dictates), in the made.com Dore collection it is covered in a matt shine, in contrast to the deep navy blue of its interior. The only drawback is that it monopolizes the attention of the very food that it sustains. 12-piece tableware for four people for 125 euros at made.com.

Facile tableware, designed in solid porcelain that allows its prolonged use even in the dishwasher and microwave.
Facile tableware, designed in solid porcelain that allows its prolonged use even in the dishwasher and microwave.

8. Gobble on marble

The Danish decoration firm Hay is largely to blame for the fact that this aqueous pattern, similar to the natural veins of translucent stone, is now almost mandatory in any modern home. H&M Home has been the last to add to the marbled effect with its series of lacquered stainless steel containers. 21-centimetre plate for 7.99 euros.

H&M Home adds to the marbled effect with its series of lacquered stainless steel containers.
H&M Home adds to the marbled effect with its series of lacquered stainless steel containers.

9. The new rustic

The beauty of imperfection that instills the Japanese aesthetic known as Wabi-sabi seduces when applied to ceramics for that unique and nostalgic finish that it gives to each piece. Unfinished edges, irregular shapes or half-chipped enamel turn a plate into a unique object to be treasured over time. HK Living’s Home Chef dinnerware emulates that effect without going through an antique store alongside reactive glazes in pink, mauve and smoky. Deep plate for 12.77 euros at liderlamp.es

HK Living Home Chef dinnerware with reactive glazes in pink, mauve and smoke.
HK Living Home Chef dinnerware with reactive glazes in pink, mauve and smoke.

10. An after-dinner meal in the Ampurdán

The artisans of Bisbal, in the eastern region of Girona, began in the 18th century a tradition that, without knowing it, would anticipate the abstract movement that would be all the rage much later. The Ampurdán tableware created by La Oficial —the well-known ceramics store at the weight of Madrid’s El Rastro— inherits its seemingly disordered artisan brushstroke to dress each emerald plant. From 8 euros the deep plate at laoficialceramica.com.

The Ampurdán tableware created by La Oficial.
The Ampurdán tableware created by La Oficial.

11. An heirloom for minimalist families

In 1961, the Palace Hotel in Tokyo opened its doors, an emblem of modernity that has prevailed since then in the skyline from the Japanese capital. Only the Royal Bar, famous for its martinis, and the TY Palace dish that the Japanese brand 1616 Arita created for the inauguration of the accommodation remain from that time. Despite the delicate appearance that unglazed porcelain gives it and the grooves that simulate the shape of a chrysanthemum, the high-density clay used resists the passage of time without cracking and can be used in the dishwasher and microwave. A jewel that will pass from generation to generation. Starting at 21.99 euros at trouva.com.

The TY Palace plate that the Japanese brand 1616 Arita created for the inauguration of the Palace Hotel in Tokyo in 1961.
The TY Palace plate that the Japanese brand 1616 Arita created for the inauguration of the Palace Hotel in Tokyo in 1961.

12. Full color

Simple and to the point. Bornn’s Colorama collection, the Turkish firm that defends the use of metal for its durability on the table, exalts color openly on all kinds of containers and plates. The round, electric tones that fill each piece are adhered to a generously thick fusion of glass and steel, which inhibits bacteria and stands the test of time. From 14 euros at Liberty London.

The Colorama collection of the Turkish firm Bornn.
The Colorama collection of the Turkish firm Bornn.

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